ILeVO helping increase yields even in SDS-tolerant varieties

Scientists who work on plant diseases know they are largely dependent on the weather as to whether they’ll see an incidence of the disease they’re studying in a given year.

Researchers like Chip Graham with Bayer CropScience were hoping for more SDS-like weather conditions for the first year of registration for their new ILeVO seed treatment for sudden death syndrome in soybeans.

They got those in the Midwest, but the weather in the Mid-South states was not as friendly to SDS as they hoped. Never-the-less, Graham and other researchers expect to see some differences in the side-by-side comparisons they planted from Louisiana to the Missouri Bootheel in 2015.

“In the Mid-South, we’re not seeing SDS at the level we’ve seen it in the last two years,” said Graham, seed treatment specialist with Bayer CropScience. “We are seeing it in pockets in some fields. We had excellent conditions for it early season; we had cool, wet weather, and we thought there might be an explosion of SDS this year. But it just hasn’t materialized.”

“The Midwest is another story,” said Graham. “They have areas where they have had tremendous levels of sudden death syndrome, and ILeVO is performing very, very well. We’ve seen yield increases of 10 bushels per acre or more in soybeans where the seed was treated with ILeVO.”

Graham has seen photos of test plots (on Twitter) that have a checker-board appearance of alternating light and dark squares in fields where test plots received the Poncho Votivo-ILeVO seed treatment and where they did not.

Graham attended the Farm Progress Show in Decatur, Ill., in early September, and talked with a number of soybean growers we had a lot of growers wanting to know more about ILeVO.”

Graham said Bayer CropScience specialists will be reviewing the results of the side-by-side comparisons of the Poncho Votivo-ILeVO-treated seed and untreated seed in the Mid-South states. “We hope we will have a lot of good data that maybe will show some differences in nematodes in some of these fields where we have nematodes.

For more on SDS, visit https://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/bp/bp-58-w.pdf.

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