Louisiana rice field day set for June 29 in Crowley

Broad range of rice-related topics to be covered. Cornell's Susan McCouch to speak on potential for advances in rice breeding.

One of the world’s leading rice geneticists will speak at the annual field day at the LSU AgCenter H. Rouse Caffey Rice Research Station on June 29.

Susan McCouch, of the Cornell University Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, will talk about the potential for advances in rice breeding.

“Dr. McCouch is highly respected internationally for her genetic work, and we are privileged to have her as a speaker,” said Steve Linscombe, director of the Rice Research Station.

McCouch developed the first molecular map of the rice genome in 1988. She also has conducted extensive studies of rice to help breeders identify genetic markers for rice traits including disease resistance, maturity, yields and drought tolerance.

The day will begin with field tours from 7:15 a.m. until 9 a.m. Speakers will discuss their latest research on rice breeding, weed control, insect and disease management, hybrid development and agronomy.

More research will be presented at a poster session until 10:30 a.m., and the indoor program begins at 10:45 a.m.

In addition to McCouch’s remarks, Jackie Loewer, chairman of the Louisiana Rice Research Board, will give an update on the board’s projects.

AgCenter economist Michael Deliberto will provide details on the rice market, and Jimmy Guinn of USA Rice will talk about the key long-grain rice markets.

Ronnie Anderson, Louisiana Farm Bureau president, will talk about Farm Bureau activities, followed by comments from LSU vice president for agriculture Bill Richardson and LSU AgCenter associate vice president Rogers Leonard.

Linscombe said the field day is an opportunity for anyone in the rice industry to find out about current issues in agriculture. “This is our chance to show our stakeholders the work we are doing for them.”

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish