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Glyphosate hearing this week in California

Many regulators have rejected link between Roundup and cancer.

A federal judge is evaluating whether the claim that glyphosate could cause cancer has been tested, reviewed and published.

U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria has spent this week hearing from experts to help decide whether there is valid scientific evidence to support the lawsuits' claim that exposure to Roundup can cause non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The San Francisco judge is presiding over more than 300 lawsuits against Monsanto Co. by cancer victims and their families who say the company knew about Roundup’s cancer risk but failed to warn them. – U.S. News and World Report

Many regulators have rejected a link between Roundup and cancer. The U.S. EPA says glyphosate is safe for humans when used in accordance with label directions. – ABC News

Plaintiffs in the lawsuit rely heavily on the International Agency for Research on Cancer’s 2015 report on glyphosate, along with experts associated with the agency based in France. This hearing will now determine whether these experts and their methodologies will be permitted in front of a jury.

"It's game over for the plaintiffs if they can't get over this hurdle," according to David Levine, an expert in federal court procedure at the University of California, Hastings College of the Law. 

This hearing comes also comes a week after District Judge William Shubb determined that California could not require companies in the state to label their products under California’s Proposition 65 because, “The required warning for glyphosate does not appear to be factually accurate and uncontroversial because it conveys the message that glyphosate’s carcinogenicity is an undisputed fact, when almost all other regulators have concluded that there is insufficient evidence that it causes cancer.” 

Source: Campaign for Accuracy in Public Health Research

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