Glover Triplett soybeans
The no-till crop production system pioneered by Drs. Glover Triplett and Dave Van Doren in 1963 has now spread to millions of acres nationwide, and more millions in other countries.

‘Father of No-Till’ honored for pioneering work

“In the world of agriculture, it’s rare that someone can bring about a positive, long-term change in farming practices,” says Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation President Mike McCormick, "but Dr. Triplett accomplished that, and has become known as The Father of No-Till Farming."

Dr. Glover Triplett, research professor at Mississippi State University, has been honored by the Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation for his pioneering more than a half-century ago that launched the no-till movement.

“In the world of agriculture, it’s rare that someone can bring about a positive, long-term change in farming practices,” said MFBF President Mike McCormick, who made the presentation at the organization’s annual Summer Commodity Conference at Mississippi State University. “But Dr. Triplett accomplished that, and has become known as The Father of No-Till Farming.

“While initial results were mixed for the project that he and Soils Physicist Dr. Dave Van Doren established at Ohio State University in 1963, they were good enough for the work to continue. And eventually, they saw the results gain approval by farmers who were able to increase yields while using less labor and drastically reducing soil erosion.

“Today, almost 60 years later, the original no-till research plots at Ohio State are still in existence, and continue in an ongoing study to further refine no-till methods.”

Triplett and Van Doren “were truly the first to have the vision and drive to start and achieve continuous, long-standing positive results with this no-cultivation practice,” McCormick said. “Dr. Triplett was also the first person to begin publicly referring to this unconventional method of production as ‘no-till farming,’ and in doing so, coined the term that is commonly used today.

Triplett award

Dr. Glover Triplett, center, was honored by the Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation for his pioneering work in no-till production. Presenting the award are Zippy Duvall, American Farm Bureau Federation president, and Mike McCormick, Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation president.

“Soon, other researchers — especially at the University of Tennessee Research Center at Milan — embraced and promoted the no-till concept, with great success.”

The system has now spread to millions of acres nationwide, and more millions in other countries. In his acceptance remarks, Triplett noted that, in addition to the cost/labor savings, billions of tons of soil that would have been washed away into streams, lakes, and rivers have been kept in place by keeping residues and cover crops in place.

“In many no-till fields, the water coming off, is nearly clear and has almost no sedimentation,” he said.

Triplett, now 87 and still doing research at MSU, grew up on a 2,000 acre farm in Noxubee County, Miss. He earned his undergraduate and master’s degrees at MSU, served in Korea as an infantry company commander, then received his Ph.D. from Michigan State University, after which he joined the faculty at Ohio State University and conducted research at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development center at Wooster. In 1982, he joined the faculty at Mississippi State University and continues his work there today.

“The progress made by Dr. Triplett has allowed farmers to maintain and increase yields, improve environmental and conservation practices, and reduce the amount of labor and energy required to grow crops,” McCormick said.

“His work has resulted in tangible cost-saving benefits to farmers nationwide, and elsewhere in the world. In appreciation of his outstanding accomplishments, it’s only fitting that we honor him as a true agricultural pioneer, and as the father of no-till farming.”

Read more about Dr. Triplett’s interesting career: http://bit.ly/2tfeumB

 

 

TAGS: Soil Health
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