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U.S., Argentina reach deal on pork

U.S. pork has been banned from Argentina since 1992.

The United States and Argentina have agreed to terms allowing U.S. pork to enter the Argentine market for the first time since 1992.

The agreement follows the Aug. 15, 2017, meeting between Vice President Mike Pence and Argentine President Mauricio Macri in Buenos Aires.

“After 25 years of discussions, America’s pork producers will soon be able to export their fine product to Argentina," Pence said. "This is one more example of the commitment of President Trump and his entire administration to breaking down international trade barriers and making free and fair trade a win-win for American workers, farmers, and our trading partners." 

The National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) applauds the Trump administration for negotiating U.S. pork access to the Argentine market. Argentina was among several countries with non-science based barriers to U.S. pork imports. 

“U.S. pork producers are the most competitive in the world and we have long sought the opportunity to provide affordable, high-quality pork in Argentina,” said NPPC President Ken Maschhoff. “We thank Secretaries Perdue and Ross, and their teams at the USDA and the Department of Commerce, as well as U.S. Trade Representative Lighthizer and his team, for their diligent work to win Argentine market access. We also thank Vice President Pence for his efforts, including a recent visit to Argentina, to move a trade agreement that promises significant U.S. economic benefits over the finish line.”

The United States is the world’s top pork exporter, and this agreement opens up a potential $10-million-per-year market for America’s pork producers. Exports added $50 -- representing 36% of the $140 average value of a hog -- to every U.S. hog marketed in 2016. Under the terms of today’s agreement, all fresh, chilled, and frozen pork and pork products from United States animals will be eligible for export to Argentina.

Argentine food safety officials will visit the United States to conduct on-site verification of the United States meat inspection system, after which United States pork exports will resume pending resolution of any outstanding technical issues.

NPPC continues to urge the administration to negotiate market access in other countries, such as India and Thailand, that remain closed to U.S. pork due to non-science based trade restrictions.

Source: The White House, NPPC

TAGS: Farm Policy
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